TG 325 - CUI: Revision of NACE SP0198 (formerly RP0198), "The Control of Corrosion Under Thermal Insulation and Fireproofing Materials—A Systems Approach"
Assignment: To revise NACE SP0198 (formerly RP0198).
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Technology Management Group: N2 - Corrosion Prevention and Control for Chemical Process and Energy, Pollution Control, Air and Sea Transportation, and Military Industries
Technology Coordinator: Murray, Neal S.
Program Coordinator: Morales, Ivan
NACE Staff Liaison: Rick Southard
Officers
Committees
SubcommitteeRelationshipCommittee
TG 325
CUI: Revision of NACE SP0198 (formerly RP0198), "The Control of Corrosion Under Thermal Insulation and Fireproofing Materials—A Systems Approach"
Administered By STG 36
Process Industry—Materials Performance in Chemicals
TG 325
CUI: Revision of NACE SP0198 (formerly RP0198), "The Control of Corrosion Under Thermal Insulation and Fireproofing Materials—A Systems Approach"
Sponsored By STG 03
Coatings and Linings, Protective: Immersion and Buried Service
TG 325
CUI: Revision of NACE SP0198 (formerly RP0198), "The Control of Corrosion Under Thermal Insulation and Fireproofing Materials—A Systems Approach"
Sponsored By STG 04
Coatings and Linings, Protective: Surface Preparation
TG 325
CUI: Revision of NACE SP0198 (formerly RP0198), "The Control of Corrosion Under Thermal Insulation and Fireproofing Materials—A Systems Approach"
Organized Under N2
Corrosion Prevention and Control for Chemical Process and Energy, Pollution Control, Air and Sea Transportation, and Military Industries
Subcommittees
 Meeting/SessionResourceType/Size
CTW - Corrosion Technology Week 2014
CUI: Revision of NACE SP0198 (formerly RP0198)
CTW 2014 MinutesMinutes (htm, 41 KB)
CORROSION 2010 Conference & Expo
TG 325 CUI: Revision of NACE Standard RP0198, "The Control of Corrosion Under Thermal Insulation an
C 2010 MinutesMinutes (htm, 58 KB)
CORROSION 2010 Conference & Expo
TG 325 CUI: Revision of NACE Standard RP0198, "The Control of Corrosion Under Thermal Insulation an
C 2010 AgendaAgenda (htm, 35 KB)
CTW - Corrosion Technology Week 2009
STG 36
CTW 2009 MinutesMinutes (htm, 39 KB)
CTW 2008
STG 36
MinutesMinutes (htm, 73 KB)
Committee Meeting/Session Resource Type/Size
Sunday, March 15, 2015
10am - 12pm

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

TG 325 [36] SP0198 The control of Corrosion Under Thermal Insulation and Fireproofing Materials-A Systems Approach

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
8am - 4pm

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

**Sponsored by STG 36 Chair: Frank Cui Vice Chair: Ivan Morales

This symposium contains for technical papers on recent experiences with corrosion resistant materials (metals and nonmetals) in the process industries, in particular in processes which involve aggressive acids such as HCl, H2SO4, HF, and HNO3. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, successes, failures, and laboratory research.**

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
8:25 - 8:50am

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Henk Helle - Although the deleterious effect of the residual elements Cu, Ni and Cr (RE) in C-steel on its corrosion resistance against HF-acid has clearly been established in numerous failure cases in HF-alkylation installations and in laboratory testing, the responsible mechanism for this effect was undisclosed. Moreover, other factors had to be active as well. Evidently, RE could not be the only cause of failures, or even a predictor for failure. In some failure cases RE was low or absent, in some non-failures RE was high. In plant acid, RE did not appear to have any effect at all. Seamless pipe and tube could suffer severe internal corrosion until paper-thin walls remained, flange faces would suffer corrosion, but plate fabrications hardly or none at all. At the at the UOP Worldwide HF Alkylation symposium in June 2014 the hypothetical model for an occluded cell corrosion mechanism was presented by the author. The proposed mechanism is driven by water formed from certain oxide i

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
8:50 - 9:15am

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Daniel Gullberg - The material selection for nitric acid production is often based on iso-corrosion diagrams which are established by general corrosion testing in a laboratory environment. However, the critical parts in a nitric acid plat which suffer the heaviest corrosion are almost always exposed to alternating wet-dry zones. The condensation and evaporation circumstances gives different corrosion mechanisms and other corrosion potentials than what is normal during general corrosion testing from which the iso-corrosion diagrams are established. Electrochemical measurements were performed on two austenitic stainless steels UNS S30403 (304L) and S31002 as well as two austenitic-ferritic stainless steels UNS S32304 and S32906 which are known to be used as construction material in nitric acid plants. Special focus was put at the open circuit potential and the transpassive transition with the purpose to determine the corrosion resistance and transpassive potential for the steel grades

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
9:25 - 9:50am

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Loto Akintoye, Olufunmilayo Joseph, Roland Loto, Joshua Okeniyi - The effect of Camellia Sinensis (green tea) extract as an organic ‘green’ inhibitor on the corrosion of mild steel in 0.5M HCl and 0.8M H2SO4 was studied at ambient temperature. Weight loss/corrosion rate and potential measurement techniques were used for the experimental work. The results were further analyzed using the two-factor ANOVA test. Potential measurement was performed using a digital voltmeter and a saturated calomel reference electrode. The tea extract was obtained from the green tea leaves. The results obtained showed effective corrosion inhibition of the extract on the mild steel test specimens in the different concentrations of hydrochloric acid and sulphuric acid used. The extracts gave appreciable corrosion inhibition performance of mild steel at all inhibitor concentrations used. There was increasing inhibitor performance with increasing concentration of inhibitor. In 0.5M HCL, the optimal performan

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
9:50 - 10:15am

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Ralph Baessler - In the literature there are not much data available to describe the corrosion behavior of titanium, nickel alloys and special stainless steels in acids at high temperature, in particular above the boiling point. Therefore, a laboratory testing program was performed with two titanium alloys (grade 2 (UNS R50400) and grade 12 (UNS R53400) to obtain corrosion data in formic acid, acetic acid, phosphoric acid, polyphosphoric acid, p-toluene sulfonic acid and lactic acid at 200 °C. Results were compared to previously published ones obtained on alloy 31 (UNS N08031), alloy 59 (UNS N06059) and B-2 (UNS N10665) From the results it can be concluded that titanium does not always show better corrosion resistance than Ni-based alloys. Alloy 59 was the best choice for formic and acetic acids at temperatures. Both Ti-alloys are resistant in acetic acid. Some slight differences were observed for formic acid, where Ti Grade 2 is only resistant up to a 20 % solution, and Grade 12 al

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
10:15 - 10:40am

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

*Bingtao Li - The corrosiveness of sulfuric acid is strongly dependent upon acid concentrations and temperatures among other factors.  Carbon steels, stainless steels and Ni-base alloys exhibit acceptable corrosion rates in many applications involving sulfuric acid depending upon the concentration of the acid and the temperatures involved.  At an acid concentration range of 70-95%, Ni-base alloys may only provide acceptable corrosion rates at lower temperatures.  At higher use temperatures such as 150 ⁰C (302 ⁰F), very limited corrosion data for Ni-base alloys is available in published literature.  The present paper discusses the results of sulfuric acid corrosion testing at 150 ⁰C (302 ⁰F) in 80% H2SO4 for weld overlays of Ni-base alloys including Ni-Cr-Mo, Ni-Cr-Fe and Ni-Mo alloys.      . *

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
10:40 - 11:05am

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Gabriella Mirabelli, Devon Baker, Warren Denning, Alan Druschitz - Nickel alloy UNS N10276 is commonly used for pipes in the sulfur scrubbers of coal-fired power plants. The pipes in these sulfur scrubbers are exposed to both gaseous and liquid sulfuric acid at moderate temperatures (<300°F), necessitating the use of corrosion-resistant alloys.  The biggest factor that controls the corrosion behavior of nickel alloy UNS N10276 is the microstructure.  There are two primary options for changing the microstructure of cast alloys: chemical composition and heat treatment.  This project focused on the effect of both chemistry and heat treatment on microstructure.  Samples with three chemistries (low, mid, high) within the alloy’s specification were produced at the Virginia Tech foundry.  Chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten were varied due to their known ability to influence the corrosion resistance of this alloy.  Heat treatments at various temperatures, holding times, and cooling rates w

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
1 - 1:25pm

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Davie Peguero, Eri Vokshi - The use of carbon steel pipework for aggressive environments in the process industries may often result in premature service lives. This prompts the need to rehabilitate or repair live components before their scheduled shut-downs. The necessity to extend the life of these components has led to the development and use of temporary non-metallic repair systems which must be resistant to the chemical environment. These systems offer cost effectiveness, ease of application, and may be engineered for specific cases. Measuring the degradation rate of these non-metallic repair systems allows them to be specified for certain applications with confidence. Case studies highlighting successes, failures  along with laboratory research are presented.      This paper will discuss the use of a non-metallic repair system coupled with laboratory research to characterize the degradation of the repair system in various environments. Changes in physical properties after 1,000

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
1:25 - 1:50pm

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Saad Al Dhafiri, Laxma Reddy Kethi Reddy, Sameer Patil, Govindarajan Narayana, Tareq Al-Foudari, Fahad Al-Otaibi - The sulfuric acid alkylation process chemically combines isobutene with a low octane olefin (usually a mixture of propylene and butylene) in the presence of sulfuric acid catalyst to yield higher octane alkylate product used in blending gasoline pool. Corrosion is primarily driven by sulfuric acid and esters formed in the process. Materials of construction in the plant are generally carbon steel although austenitic stainless steels like SS 316, UNS N08020 are used selectively to resist acid corrosion. Temperature and flow velocity have a direct relationship to corrosion rates. Operational control of these process variables in combination with mechanical design is important to minimize corrosion rate even in an super-austenitic alloy like UNS N08020. This paper describes the frequent failures of super-austenitic stainless alloy UNS N08020 in effluent treatment section of

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
1:50 - 2:15pm

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Evgeny Barmatov, Trevor Hughes - Matrix acidizing of oil and gas reservoirs is a widely established technique to increase hydrocarbon production. Strong mineral acids such as HCl or HCl/HF mixtures are injected into the well at high concentrations. For this application, corrosion inhibitors are enabling because uninhibited matrix acidizing treatment fluids would induce severe corrosion of downhole equipment. A broad range of organic film-forming corrosion inhibitors have been developed to retard the acid corrosion of production tubing and coiled tubing through which the acidizing fluids are injected. In this paper, the corrosion inhibition of polymerizable organic corrosion inhibitors for a coiled tubing low carbon steel (HS80), mild carbon steel (N80), high alloy (13Cr) and Duplex (2205) casing steels in 4M hydrochloric acid solution at 80°C was investigated by weight loss and electrochemical techniques. This paper summarizes structure-properties relationships for various polymeri

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
2:25 - 2:50pm

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Matthew Yao - Co-Cr-W alloys, such as Stellite 6 (UNS R30006), have long been served in various industries for high-temperature corrosion and wear applications. The Co-Cr-Mo alloys are developed to meet the market requirements for improved corrosion resistance with similar wear resistance as of Co-Cr-W alloys, especially for oil and gas, and power generation industries. The corrosion and wear resistance of a Nb (niobium) alloyed Stellite 728 alloy is studied in this work. In addition, Stellite 6 (UNS R30006) and Stellite 21 (UNS R30021) are chosen to be compared with. According to ASTM G59, potentiodynamic polarization test is conducted in three different electrolytes - 10% H2SO4 (215 ), 5% HCl (150 ) and 65% HNO3 (150 ). The immersion test is dealt within the same conditions as well by following ASTM G31. Furthermore, the critical pitting temperatures of these alloys are detected in three solutions. Wear testing is conducted according to ASTM G65 (abrasion), ASTM G98 (galling), AS

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
2:50 - 3:15pm

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Brian DeForce, John Grubb, Charles Stinner - Nickel-chromium-molybdenum (Ni-Cr-Mo) alloys are used in the chemical processing industry for very aggressive conditions. They have a long history of use in acids such as hydrochloric (HCl) and sulfuric (H2SO4) over a range of concentrations and temperature. Selection of the appropriate Ni-Cr-Mo alloy for a given environment is not always straightforward. This paper compares the corrosion resistance of three common highly corrosion-resistant alloys in several acid solutions. The corrosion resistance of UNS N10276[1], UNS N06022, and UNS N06059 were measured in four environments.  The solutions used were 10% HCl at 40 °C, 35% HCl at 50 °C, 20% H2SO4 at the boiling point, and 85% H2SO4 at the boiling point. Additionally, the effect of chloride on sulfuric acid corrosion was investigated in a boiling solution of 5% H2SO4 with 2000 ppm of chloride. The results show that the ranking of these alloys relative to corrosion resistance is dependent

Tuesday, March 17, 2015
3:15 - 3:40pm

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

*Narasi Sridhar, Andrzej Anderko - Corrosion in process industries often occurs in mixtures of various acids and salts. Such corrosion behavior cannot be predicted simply by extrapolation from the behavior in pure acids. For example, corrosion behavior in wet process phosphoric acid is significantly different from that in pure orthophosphoric acid due to variety of impurities in the former. Corrosion behavior in sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid mixtures is quite different from that in either of the pure acids. Acid mixtures can be broadly classified as: (1) mixtures of two non-oxidizing strong acids; (2) mixtures with one strong acid containing an aggressive species, such as a halide ion; (3) mixtures in which one of the acids or salts has an inhibitive species, such as a nitrate ion; (4) mixtures in which one component generates a high redox potential; and (5) mixtures of relatively weak organic acids and aggressive salts.  Extensive experimental data has been generated on corrosion *

Thursday, March 19, 2015
9 - 11am

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Joint Meeting STG 02,03, 04 Coatings & Linings, Protective-Atmospheric, Immersion & Buried Service, Surface Preparation

Thursday, March 19, 2015
9 - 11am

CORROSION 2015 Conference & Expo
Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center
Sunday, March 15, 2015 - Thursday, March 19, 2015

Joint Meeting STG 02,03, 04 Coatings & Linings, Protective-Atmospheric, Immersion & Buried Service, Surface Preparation

NACE MR0175/ISO 15156 – historical background to CRA application limits
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